Cocktails and Canapés

From The How and When, An Authoritative reference reference guide to the origin, use and classification of the world’s choicest vintages and spirits by Hyman Gale and Gerald F. Marco. The Marco name is of a Chicago family that were involved in all aspects of the liquor business and ran Marco’s Bar located at 70 E. Randolph Street and another at 32 S. Clark St. in Chicago back in the day.

The How and When has over 1000 cocktail recipes inside plus some great canapes, or cocktail snacks.  For example, here a  few made from common and readily available ingredients:

Crabmeat Spread:

Mix one 6 ounce can of flaked crabmeat with 1/2 cup of chopped celery, 1/4 cup minced canned pimiento, 3/4 cup mayonnaise, 1/8 teaspoon salt, 3/8 teaspoon paprika. Spread on toast.

Sardines and Olives:

Mash together sardines, stuffed olives, and fresh butter. Spread on toasted bread or saltines and garnish with finely sliced olives.

Sardine and Egg Spread:

Combine 4 hard boiled egg yolks, minced fine, with 3 3/4 ounce can of sardines mashed. Add 1 tablespoon lemon juice, 2 tablespoons mayonnaise, and 1 tablespoon French dressing. Spread on Toast

Ham and Olive Spread:

Mix 1/8 pound minced cooked ham (2/3 cup), 1/2 cup finely chopped stuffed olives, 2 tablespoons minced parsley, 1 tablespoon A-1 sauce and 3/4 cup mayonnaise. Spread on toast or cracker base.

Anchovy and Cream Cheese Spread:

One 3 ounce cream cheese package, 1 tablespoon anchovy past, 1 teaspoon minced onion and mix to a smooth paste. Spread on a a foundation of toast or crackers.

Peanut Butter Canape:

Spread crackers or saltines with peanut butter and garnish with a small piece of crisp bacon on top.

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On a side note: A little investigative history of the Marco Bros. and my book copy ( for the book collectors and historians out there) 

My copy is the Third Revised Ed. of January 1945.  The First Ed. was printed in September of 1938.

My copy of the book happened to belong to a former employee by the name of Gustav Strauss.  My research on Mr. Strauss puts him living at 6232 Bernice in Chicago in 1940, aged 47, born in 1897,  and married to Emma Strauss with a daughter named Lorraine Strauss.

From what little is available on the history on the Marco Bros. online, we find that the Marco Bros. had their own brands of hard liquor which included Marco’s Crest, Marco’s Kentucky, Marco’s London Dry Gin, Old Blue Springs, and Stuarts Old Rare. Their business shows up in the 1913 and 1918 Chicago Business Directories as having been located at 3228 Lincoln Ave (1913), and 3262 Lincoln Ave (1917-1918).  It appears they were involved in every aspect of the liquor trade from distilling, wholesaling, retailing, and running bars.  They were apparently quite the renaissance men of the Chicago liquor trade.

Gerald F. Marco, the book’s author died in 2007 according to this Chicago Tribune obituary:

Gerald F. Marco, 93, former owner of Marco Liquors and noted designer of collectible decanters, beloved husband of Helen, nee Rosenthal; devoted father of Ellen-Sue (Ronald) Rubenstein and Richard (Laura) Marco; loving grandfather of Alan (Bari), Brian (Andrea) Rubenstein, Blair (Nolan) Lebovitz, Adam Rubenstein, Melissa (David) Miller and Jim Marco; great-grandfather of Gabriel and Justin.”

A further reference from the Blog Drinks with Nick, mentions his copy of the book and notes that Gerald was apparently the son of Abe.  Nick’s copy has the following inscription written in it:

1888                                                                       1938
What Half a Hundred Years Have Meant
“How swiftly they have gone–these past fifty years that now usher in our Golden Jubilee.  Yet, they have been years full of fond memories and most pleasant associations.  We wish to dedicate these years which have passed, to the future which is to be, and are doing this through the medium of this little book which I trust you will permit me to present to you.”
Sincerely,
Abe Marco
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No society can surely be flourishing and happy, of which the far greater part of the members are poor and miserable.

— Adam Smith