The Perfect Salad Dressing

The following recipes are from a small booklet entitled 500 Delicious Salads that was published for the Culinary Arts Institute in 1940 by Consolidated Book Publishers, Inc. 153 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, Ill.

If you have been looking for a way to lighten up your salads and be free of calorie filled store bought salad dressings, then the following just might do the trick. 

French Dressing

1 cups olive oil
1/4 cup vinegar
1/2 teaspoon salt
Few grains cayenne
1/4 teaspoon white pepper
2 teaspoons chopped parsley

Combine and beat or shake thoroughly before using. Makes 1 1/4 cups.

Variations Using 1 cup of French Dressing as a Foundation

  • Anchovy

Add 2 tablespoons anchovy paste or mashed anchovies and 1 tablespoon pearl oinions.

  • Caper

Add 1/3 cup minced capers.

  • Chiffonade

Add 1 tablespoon each chopped beets, chopped chives and chopped hard-cooked eggs.

  • Chive

Add 1 tablespoon, minced shallot of onions.

  • Cottage Cheese

Add 3 tablespoons cottage cheese and 1 tablespoon chopped chives.

  • Cucumber

Add 3 tablespoons grated cucumber and 1 tablespoon chopped chives.

  • Fine Herbes

Add 1 tablespoon each minced parsley, watercress, chervil and basil.

  • Garlic

Rub bowl with crushed glove of garlic

  • Ginger Ale

Use two tablespoons each vinegar and ginger ale.

  • Horse Radish

Add 1 teaspoon prepared horseradish.

  • India

Add 2 tablespoons chutney, 2 chopped hard-cooked eggs and a 1/2 teaspoon curry powder.

  • Mustard

Add 2 teaspoons prepared mustard to Garlic French Dressing.

  • Pearl Onion

Add 2 tablespoons pearl onions.

  • Roquefort

Add 1/3 cup soft Roquefort cheese, crumbled first and creamed with two tablespoons french dressing.

  • Tarragon

Use a quarter cup tarragon vinegar.

  • Tomato

Add 1 cup tomato juice, 1/2 glove garlic minced, and 1 tablespoon confectioner’s sugar.

  • Vinaigrette

Add 1 tablespoon chopped chives, 1 tablespoon chopped sweet pickles and 1 teaspoon chopped capers.

  • White Wine

Use 1/4 cup white wine vinegar.

 

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It is not from the benevolence of the butcher, the brewer, or the baker that we expect our dinner, but from their regard to their own interest.

— Adam Smith