Dame Edith Sitwell

Sitwell Family; From left: Edith Sitwell (1887-1964), Sir George Sitwell, Lady Ida, Sacheverell Sitwell (1897-1988), and Osbert Sitwell (1892-1969) – Oil on canvas by John Singer Sargent

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Patek Phillipe Service and Maintenance

Patek Phillipe hand makes the finest watches in the world.  Click here to learn more.

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Why Beauty Matters – Sir Roger Scruton

Sadly, Sir Roger Scruton passed away a few days ago—January 12th, 2020.  Heaven has gained a great philosopher. Continue reading Why Beauty Matters — Sir Roger Scruton

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Slaughter in Bombay

From Allen’s Indian Mail, December 3rd, 1851

BOMBAY.
MUSULMAN FANATICISM.

On the evening of November 15th, the little village of Mahim was the scene of a murder, perhaps the most determined which has ever stained the annals of Bombay. Three men were massacred in cold blood, in a house used by the Kojah caste, in open daylight, all in the middle of a densely-populated part of the town. Thirteen prisoners are in custody. Continue reading Slaughter in Bombay

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Chinese Duck Cooking – A Few Recipes

China has more ducks than any other country in the world.  For this reason the Chinese have found interesting ways of converting the fowl into many palatable dishes. The duck used is the kind that dwells in marshes.  The Muscovy duck is not a native of China and is called foreign duck.

FRIED DUCK

Clean and disjoint a young duck.  Sprinkle with salt and pepper.  Cover the bottom of frying pan with peanut oil about half an inch deep.  When oil sizzles, put in the pieces of duck and fry slowly until a delicate brown, turning the pieces occasionally.  Mix six tablespoons Chinese saucea in half a cup of water with a piece of shredded ginger, four tablespoonful of wine, and few green onion sprouts.  Pour contents over the duck, cover, and let cook over slow fire for 20 minutes longer.

a(soyu or soy sauce)

Continue reading Chinese Duck Cooking — A Few Recipes

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The Preparation of Marketable Vinegar

Formerly vinegar was prepared on the farm to a greater extent than now.  The introduction of laws for the control of the sale of vinegar, altho intended to help the honest manufacturer, has discouraged the preparation of vinegar for sale in a small way, not because it is difficult to meet the requirements but because some care must be taken in the operation in the order that the finished product comply therewith.

It is unnecessary to point out that low-grade fruit may often be used to advantage in the preparation of vinegar.  This has always been true in the case of apples and may be true with other fruit, especially grapes.  The use of grapes for wine making is an outlet which in now to be denied, and one alternative is the manufacture of vinegar from such grapes as are undesirable for eating.  The juice makes a very excellent vinegar, thought be some to be the superior to apple-cider vinegar. Continue reading The Preparation of Marketable Vinegar

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Making Apple Cider Vinegar

The greatest cause of failure in vinegar making is carelessness on the part of the operator. Intelligent separation should be made of the process into its various steps from the beginning to end.

PRESSING THE JUICE

The apples should be clean and ripe. If not clean, undesirable fermentations may develop which will injure the quality of the finished product. Fruit which is just ripe contains the maximum amount of sugar. If the fruit is too green or over-ripe there may not be sufficient sugar present for the final production of a per cent acetic acid. Dirt, grass, leaves, rotten and wormy fruit bear millions of bacteria, some of which are sure to be of undesirable varieties. These may be the cause of bad flavors, and may make the vinegar low in acid, off-color, and turbid. Continue reading Making Apple Cider Vinegar

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English Fig Wine

Take the large blue figs when pretty ripe, and steep them in white wine, having made some slits in them, that they may swell and gather in the substance of the wine.

Then slice some other figs and let them simmer over a fire in water until they are reduced to a kind of pulp.

Then strain out the water, pressing the pulp hard and pour it as hot as possible on the figs that are imbrued in the wine.

Let the quantities be nearly equal, but the water somewhat more than the wine and figs.

Let them stand twenty-four hours, mash them well together, and draw off what will run without squeezing.

Then press the rest, and if not sweet enough add a sufficient quantity of sugar to make it so.

Let it ferment, and add to it a little honey and sugar candy, then fine it with white of eggs, and a little isinglass, and draw it off for use.

[From: Old Time Recipes for Home Made Wines, Cordials and Liquerurs From Fruits, Flowers, Vegetables, and Shrubs, Compiled by Helen S. Wright, Boston, The Page Company, Publishers, Copyright 1909, by Dana Estes and Company,  Fourth Impression, January. 1922 Printed by C.H. Simonds Company, Boston, Mass, USA]

 

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He Put a Hook in Me by Lil’ Lost Lou

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Take Me to Pitcairn by Julian McDonnell

To learn more about Julian McDonnell, film director, click here.

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Cocillana Syrup Compound

Guarea guidonia

Guarea guidonia

Recipe

  • 5 Per Cent  Alcohol
  • 8-24 Grain – Heroin Hydrochloride
  • 120 Minims – Tincture Euphorbia Pilulifera
  • 120 Minims – Syrup Wild Lettuce
  • 40 Minims – Tincture Cocillana
  • 24 Minims – Syrup Squill Compound
  • 8 Gram – Ca(s)ecarin (P, D, & Co.)
  • 8-100 Grain Menthol

Dose – One-half to one fluidrams (2 to 4 ct)

Guaranteed under The Food and Drug Act. June 30th, 1906 Guranty No. 6, Park, Davis & Co. Detroit Michigan

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Religion is regarded by the common people as true, by the wise as false, and by the rulers as useful.

— Seneca the Younger