The Effect of Magnetic Fields on Wound Healing

The Effect of Magnetic Fields on Wound Healing
Experimental Study and Review of the Literature

Steven L. Henry, MD, Matthew J. Concannon, MD, and Gloria J. Yee, MD
Division of Plastic Surgery, University of Missouri Hospital & Clinics, Columbia, MO
Published July 25, 2008

Objective: Magnets are purported to aid wound healing despite a paucity of scientific evidence. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of static magnetic fields on cutaneous wound healing in an animal model. The  literature was reviewed to explore the historical and scientific basis of magnet therapy and to define its current role in the evidence-based practice of plastic surgery. Continue reading The Effect of Magnetic Fields on Wound Healing

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Ought King Leopold to be Hanged?

Click image to view larger version.

For the somewhat startling suggestion in the heading of this interview, the missionary interviewed is in no way responsible. The credit of it, or, if you like, the discredit, belongs entirely to the editor of the Review, who, without dogmatism, wishes to pose the question as a matter for serious discussion. Since Charles I’s head was cut off, opposite Whitehall, nearly two hundred and fifty years ago, the sanctity which doth hedge about a king has been held in slight and scant regard by the Puritans and their descendants. Hence there is nothing antecedently shocking or outrageous in the discussion of the question whether the acts of any Sovereign are such as to justify the calling in of the services of the public executioner. It is not, of course, for a journalist to pronounce judgment, but no function of the public writer is so imperative as that of calling attention to great wrongs, and no duty is more imperious than that of insisting that no rank or station should be allowed to shield from justice the real criminal when he is once discovered. Continue reading Ought King Leopold to be Hanged?

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Storing Drinking Water in Copper Vessels for Microbial Purification

Are you considering purchasing a copper water pitcher for storing drinking water but have questions about the effects on your health?

The following study may help jump-start your research.

Storing Drinking-water in Copper pots Kills Contaminating Diarrhoeagenic Bacteria

ABSTRACT

Microbially-unsafe water is still a major concern in most developing countries. Although many water-purification methods exist, these are expensive and beyond the reach of many people, especially in rural areas. Ayurveda recommends the use of copper for storing drinking-water. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of copper pot on microbially-contaminated drinking-water. The antibacterial effect of copper pot against important diarrhoeagenic bacteria, including Vibrio cholerae O1, Shigella flexneri 2a, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, enteropathogenic E. coli, Salmonella enterica Typhi, and Salmonella Paratyphi is reported. When drinking-water (pH 7.83±0.4; source: ground) was contaminated with 500 CFU/mL of the above bacteria and stored in copper pots for 16 hours at room temperature, no bacteria could be recovered on the culture medium. Recovery failed even after resuscitation in enrichment broth, followed by plating on selective media, indicating loss of culturability. This is the first report on the effect of copper on S. flexneri 2a, enteropathogenic E. coli, and Salmonella Paratyphi. After 16 hours, there was a slight increase in the pH of water from 7.83 to 7.93 in the copper pots while the other physicochemical parameters remained unchanged. Copper content (177±16 ppb) in water stored in copper pots was well within the permissible limits of the World Health Organization. Copper holds promise as a point-of-use solution for microbial purification of drinking-water, especially in developing countries.

Click here to read the entire study.

Click here to read more on the topic of water stored in copper vessels.

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The Red-Headed Macaw

I swapped a parakeet for a red-headed Macaw
That drank my rum and called me paw
I’d rock in my chair, she’d swing on her perch
When the preacher came around she’d pretend it was church

On Saturday mornings when we drove into town
She’d ride on the back of my blue-tick hound
Howling in unison while we made the rounds

She worked out a scheme with a barber named Ed
Alleviating customers of any spare change they had
by rolling over and playing dead

She stayed with me near fourteen years
Drinking rum, always near
Then one day she bolted towards the sun
So I filled her with buckshot from my trusty old shotgun

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Paramilitary Operations in the Congo: Witchcraft, Sorcery, Magic and Other Psychological Phenomena

WITCHCRAFT, SORCERY, MAGIC AND OTHER PSYCHOLOGICAL PHENOMENA AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS ON MILITARY AND PARAMILITARY OPERATIONS IN THE CONGO

This report has been prepared in response to a query posed by ODCS/OPS, Department of the Army, regarding the purported use of witchcraft, sorcery, and magic by insurgent elements in the Republic of the Congo (Leopoldville). Magical practices are said to be effective in conditioning dissident elements and their followers to do battle with Government troops. Continue reading Paramilitary Operations in the Congo: Witchcraft, Sorcery, Magic and Other Psychological Phenomena

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Coffee & Cigarettes

Aw, the good old days, meet in the coffee shop with a few friends, click open the Zippo, inhale a glorious nosegay of lighter fluid, fresh roasted coffee and a Chesterfield cigarette….

A Meta-analysis of Coffee Drinking, Cigarette Smoking, and the Risk of Parkinson’s Disease

We conducted a systematic review to summarize the epidemiological evidence on the association between cigarette smoking, coffee drinking, and the risk of Parkinson’s disease. Case–control and cohort studies that reported the relative risk of physician-confirmed Parkinson’s disease by cigarette smoking or coffee drinking status were included. Study-specific log relative risks were weighted by the inverse of their variances to obtain a pooled relative risk and its 95% confidence interval (CI). Results for smoking were based on 44 case–control and 4 cohort studies, and for coffee 8 case–control and 5 cohort studies. Compared with never smokers, the relative risk of Parkinson’s disease was 0.59 (95% CI, 0.54–0.63) for ever smokers, 0.80 (95% CI, 0.69–0.93) for past smokers, and 0.39 (95% CI, 0.32–0.47) for current smokers. The relative risk per 10 additional pack-years was 0.84 (95% CI, 0.81–0.88) in case–control studies and 0.78 (95% CI, 0.73–0.84) in cohort studies. Compared with non–coffee drinkers, relative risk of Parkinson’s disease was 0.69 (95% CI, 0.59–0.80) for coffee drinkers. The relative risk per three additional cups of coffee per day was 0.75 (95% CI, 0.64–0.86) in case–control studies and 0.68 (95% CI, 0.46–1.00) in cohort studies. This meta-analysis shows that there is strong epidemiological evidence that smokers and coffee drinkers have a lower risk of Parkinson’s disease. Further research is required on the biological mechanisms underlying this potentially protective effect.

Click here to read the full study entitled: A Meta-analysis of Coffee Drinking, Cigarette Smoking, and the Risk of Parkinson’s Disease 

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The Hatha Yoga Pradipika

THE HATHA YOGA PRADIPIKA

Translated into English by
PANCHAM SINH

Panini Office, Allahabad
[1914]

INTRODUCTION.

There exists at present a good deal of misconception with regard to the practices of the Haṭha Yoga. People easily believe in the stories told by those who themselves heard them second hand, and no attempt is made to find out the truth by a direct reference to any good treatise. It is generally believed that the six practices, in Haṭha Yoga are compulsory on the student and that besides being dirty, they are fraught with danger to the practiser. This is not true, for these practices are necessary only in the existence of impurities in the Nâdis, and not otherwise. Continue reading The Hatha Yoga Pradipika

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Seeds for Rootstocks of Fruit and Nut Trees

THE PRINCIPAL fruit and nut trees grown commercially in the United States (except figs, tung, and filberts) are grown as varieties or clonal lines propagated on rootstocks.

Almost all the rootstocks are grown from seed. The resulting seedlings then are either budded or grafted with propagating wood of the desired variety. This practice has come about chiefly because the improved varieties of these fruits and nuts do not come true from seed and are not easily propagated on their own roots from cuttings. Continue reading Seeds for Rootstocks of Fruit and Nut Trees

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Producing and Harvesting Tobacco Seed

Setting up Tobacco Plants in Carolina – USDA Photo

THE FIRST step in producing a satisfactory crop of tobacco is to use good seed that is true to type. The grower often can save his own seed to advantage, if he wants to.

Before topping is done, he should go over the tobacco field carefully to pick out desirable seed plants. When he has decided on the ideal type of plant, he should select the plants that conform to this type for producing seed.  One plant produces about one-half ounce of viable seed (about 150 thousand seeds), which is enough for 100 square yards in seedbed area and, if conditions are favorable, enough seedlings to plant 2 to 5 acres. Continue reading Producing and Harvesting Tobacco Seed

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Wine Making

Wine Making 

Grapes are the world’s leading fruit crop and the eighth most important food crop in the world, exceeded only by the principal cereals and starchytubers. Though substantial quantities are used for fresh fruit, raisins, juice and preserves, most of the world’s annual production of about 60 million metric tons is used for dry (nonsweet) wine.

Wine is of great antiquity, as every Bible reader knows, and a traditional and important element in the daily fare of millions.  Used in moderation, it is wholesome and nourishing, and gives zest to the simplest diet.  It is a source of a broad range of essential minerals, some vitamins, and easily assimilated calories provided by its moderate alcoholic content. Continue reading Wine Making

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Clover Wine

  1. Add 3 quarts clover blossoms* to 4 quarts of boiling water removed from heat at point of boil. Let stand for three days.
  2. At the end of the third day, drain the juice into another container leaving the blossoms.
  3. Add three quarts of fresh water and the peel of one lemon to the blossoms and boil for fifteen minutes.
  4. Drain again and add this to the first container of juice.
  5. Add a pound of sugar to each quart of juice.
  6. Ferment with one cup of yeast. Keep in warm room for three weeks and then bottle.

* Blossoms are the flowers, not the leaves. A variety of clovers can be used. A conversation with a local farmer could be rewarding here. 

 

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On the Growth of Plants in Closely Glazed Cases by Nathaniel Bagwell Ward

Nathaniel Bagshaw Ward

What follows is a chapter from Nathaniel Bagshaw Ward’s 1852 treatise on terrarium gardening.

ON THE NATURAL CONDITIONS OF PLANTS.

To enter into any lengthened detail on the all-important subject of the Natural Conditions of Plants would occupy far too much space; yet to pass it by without special notice, in any work treating of their cultivation, would be impossible. Without a knowledge of the laws which regulate their growth, all out attempts must be empirical and more or less abortive. When we survey the vegetation on the surface of the earth, we are struck with the endless diversities of form which present themselves to our astonished gaze, from the magnificent palms of the Tropics and the bread-fruit of the Polynesian Islands to the reindeer moss of Lapland, or the red snow of the Arctic regions. Yet the growth of all is governed by immutable laws, and they owe their forms to varying climatal conditions. Continue reading On the Growth of Plants in Closely Glazed Cases by Nathaniel Bagwell Ward

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Something about Caius College, Cambridge

Gonville & Caius College, known as Caius and pronounced keys was founded in 1348 by Edmund Gonville, the Rector of Terrington St Clement in Norfolk.   The first name was thus Goville Hall and it was dedicated to the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary.  Caius College, along with Pembroke, Corpus Christi, and Trinity Hall were all founded within a decade of one another.   Many believe this proliferation of colleges came about due to the plague or the Black Death of 1348 which took the lives of many learned men, thus these colleges are often attributed “plague colleges”, established to cultivate a new generation of educated men.

Three parcels of land for the college was purchased by Gonville on March 5th 1347. In January 1348 King Edward III granted the right to establish and endow a Hall.  Edmund Gonville did not  have the resources necessary to properly endow the college and following his death in the summer of 1351, the Bishop of Norwich, William Batemen took control of the finances, and brought in further endowment.  The College remained under-endowed until 1557 when a former student named John Keys, who spelled his name Caius on legal documents, stepped in from his successful City of London medical practice.  He offered to re-found his alma mater as Gonville and Caius College.  In 1558 Dr. Caius was elected Master.

Dr. Caius substantially increased the endowment during his tenure as Master through additional land purchases by use of his own funds and donations.  Upon part of the land donated by Dr. Caius today sits Tree Court as shown in the photo below. Upon his death in 1573, he was buried in the College Chapel.

Tree Court

Today, March 31st, 2018, six porters from the college shall serve as pall bearers for the funeral of world-renowned scientist Dr. Stephen Hawking.  Hawking was educated at Caius and it served as his academic home for over 52 years.

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News from the Empire – Jan. 17th, 1851 Vol IX-No.165 – Allen’s Indian Mail

Filed under Miscellaneous.

The Jubbulpore School of Industry is so thriving that the pupils, 800 in number, are obliged to work till ten o’clock at night to complete their orders; this they do most cheerfully. They are all Thugs, or the children of Thugs, and the hands which now ply the shuttle, or the axe, or the saw, have through the greater portion of their lives been familiar only with the poison cup or strangling rope.

Maulmain—On the 23rd November, the town of Maulmain was nearly blown up by the explosion of two hundred casks of gunpowder, which accidentally caught fire.

Captain Impey. —Extract of a letter from Maulmain.—”The The intelligence which has reached us of Captain Impey is not of the most positive nature, He is at one time said to be marching at the head of 20,000 Burmans to the attack of the Shans; at anothertime he is reported to be at Ava tendering his allegiance to that court and government, and the latest account is that that unfortunate and misguided man is ‘lying sick at Kherannee, Pappo’s village, having neither joined the Shans nor the Burmans.  I have reason to believe that this letter is the correct statement.  His friend Mr. Tracey some time ago applied to Government for the grant of a forest on the east bank of the Thoung-yeen, and pending the boon, both himself and Capt. Impey are lying upon their oars.  As soon as the sanction is obtained, both intend to set vigourously to work in the timber trade, so that all the reports of his heading an army, and all that sort of stuff, is sheer downright nonsense.”—Englishman

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Snipe Shooting

Snipe shooting-Epistle on snipe shooting, from Ned Copper
Cap, Esq., to George Trigger-George Trigger’s reply to
Ned Copper Cap-Black partridge.

——

“Si sine amore jocisque
Nil est jucundum, vivas in &more jooisque.”
-Horace.
“If nothing appears to you delightful without love and
sports, then live in sporta and love.”

——

I LOVE shooting. It is enjoyed in the open air. It removes one from the vicinity of flat-roofed, candle-pillared, sun-dried, brick-built, mulligatawny looking houses. You pursue it alone, or, in the society of a friend, equally well. Occasionally it is (I allow) rather hot work, but to a man whose particular taste may lead him to the viewing and enjoying the rays of that great luminary, the sun, shooting affords him the very best opportunity. A good day’s snipe shooting is however, in my opinion, sufficiently exciting to keep away all thoughts and fidgetings about either his power, influence or effects.

As yet old Phœbus has behaved with great liberality and kindness towards me, nor has he ever even shown an inclination in his hottest moments to quarrel. He has now, for some years past, thrown his burning beams pretty freely about my head when in pursuit of the snipe, and up to this day I am unscathed. Continue reading Snipe Shooting

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Life Among the Thugee

Group of Thuggee – From Harpers Magazine – Dec. 12, 1837

The existence of large bodies of men having no other means of subsistence than those afforded by plunder, is, in all countries, too common to excite surprise; and, unhappily, organized bands of assassins are not peculiar to India! The associations of murderers known by the name of Thugs present, however, so many remarkable points of character and manners, that curiosity may reasonably be excited to inquire into the history, and ascertain the feelings, opinions, and motives of persons differing, in many respects, so widely even from all other followers of their own horrible occupation. In different parts of India, these ruffians assume, and have been designated by, various names, derived either from the mode by which they dispatch their victims-from the purpose for which they destroy life, or from the arts by which they inveigle their prey to destruction. In the more northern parts of India, these murderers are called Thugs, the name by which they are most generally known among Europeans. This term signifies It “deceiver.” In some provinces to the southward, according to Dr. Sherwood, they have obtained the name of Phansigars, or It stranglers,” from the Hindostanee word phanai, a It noose.” By the same authority it is stated, that in the Tamul language they are called Ari Tulucar, or Mussulman It noosers”; in Canarese, Tanti Calleru, implying” thieves who use a wire or catgut noose”; and in Telagu, Warlu Wahndlu, or Warlu Vayshay Wahndloo, meaning people who use the noose.” Continue reading Life Among the Thugee

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Fruits of the Empire: Licorice Root and Juice

Liquorice, the roots of Glycirrhiza Glabra, a perennial plant, a native of the south of Europe, but cultivated to some extent in England, particularly at Mitcham, in Surrey.

Its root, which is its only valuable part, is long, fibrous, of a yellow colour, and when fresh, very juicy. The liquorice root grows wild in many parts of Greece, and especially in the province of Achaia, at Corinth and Missolonghi, in great abundance; its quality is considered very good, and has induced many to undertake its manufacture. Large quantities are annually prepared for exportation. Continue reading Fruits of the Empire: Licorice Root and Juice

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Of Interest to Heavy Drinkers: Cleansing the Liver with Northern Ground Cone (Boschniaka rossica)

The following research discussion is from a study funded by the U.S. National Institute of Health entitled: Boschniakia rossica prevents the carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatotoxicity in rat.  It may be of interest to heavy drinkers. Continue reading Of Interest to Heavy Drinkers: Cleansing the Liver with Northern Ground Cone (Boschniaka rossica)

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Birth of United Fruit Company

From Conquest of the Tropics by Frederick Upham Adams

Chapter VI – Birth of the United Fruit Company

Only those who have lived in the tropic and are familiar with the hazards which confront the cultivation and marketing of its fruits can readily understand the motives which impelled a union of the interests of the Boston Fruit Company and those headed by Minor C. Keith.  It was not a move calculated to control competition or to rear a monopoly; it was the business step imperatively required to secure the permanency of the banana industry.  Continue reading Birth of United Fruit Company

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Banana Propagation

Banana Propagation

Reprinted from the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA.org)

The traditional means of obtaining banana planting material (“seed”) is to acquire suckers from one’s own banana garden, from a neighbor, or from a more distant source. This method served to spread common varieties around the world and to multiply them in their new locations. This system can be modified to produce more banana suckers or shoots by manipulating banana corms to allow more buds to sprout. One such method that is described here is called macropropagation. A higher tech procedure to rapidly produce many plants in just a few generations of propagation is called tissue culture. In tissue culture, plants are first surface sterilized and then grown in aseptic culture in test tubes using an artificial growth medium based on a gelling agent like agar. The tender tissue-cultured plants can then be planted in the field after rooting and hardening under protected conditions. Continue reading Banana Propagation

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The Character of a Happy Life


How happy is he born and taught.
That serveth not another’s will;
Whose armour is his honest thought,
And simple truth his utmost skill

Whose passions not his masters are;
Whose soul is still prepared for death,
Untied unto the world by care
Of public fame or private breath;

Who envies none that chance doth raise,
Nor vice; who never understood
How deepest wounds are given by praise;
Nor rules of state, but rules of good;

Who hath his life from rumours freed;
Whose conscience is his strong retreat;
Whose state can neither flatterers feed,
Nor ruin make oppressors great;

Who God doth late and early pray
More of His grace than gifts to lend;
And entertains the harmless day
With a religious book or friend;

This man is freed from servile bands
Of hope to rise or fear to fall:
Lord of himself, though not of lands,
And having nothing, yet hath all.

Sir Henry Wotton

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Cup of Tea? To be or not to be

Is the tea in your cup genuine?

The fact is, had one been living in the early 19th Century, one might occasionally encounter a counterfeit cup of tea.  Food adulterations to include added poisonings and suspect substitutions were a common problem in Europe at the time. Continue reading Cup of Tea? To be or not to be

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Reason’s whole pleasure, all the joys of sense, Lie in three words, —health, peace, and competence.

— Pope